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Author Topic: Tow Capacity of 2007 F150  (Read 5992 times)
Spartan I
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« on: January 14, 2011, 04:58:49 AM »

I know what the tow specs are for my 07 F150 FX2 Sport and I have the tow package with a 5.4 engine. I now tow a 2007 Bayside with no problem but looking to go on road for many months at a time and will consider moving to a trailer. I have little experience towing bigger rigs. My question is --what is a realistic max tow weight and hitch weight  for spending many months and many miles over all conditions including mountain areas thru out the country. Most trailers I am looking at have a dry weight of 5500-6500 the a hitch weight of 400-650.  I hope to not be force to buy a bigger truck.    Thanks for any feedback based on your experience.
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gec66
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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2011, 05:23:16 AM »

IMO, at 300hp and tow capacity of 9,500lbs you are still in the sweet spot assuming you max out at approx. 7,500lbs or 80% of capacity.  Significant grades will require patience as will head winds, but the only way to negate that is to go extreme over-kill.  Towing a pup with that truck is that and I'm sure you are spoiled at the moment.  Wind resistance and its effect on fuel economy and the speed you can comfortably tow at will be very noticeable, but again the only solution is over-kill.  Be prepared for a mirror upgrade as a TT will be wider than the pup.  Invest in a quality wdh and the tongue weight will not be an issue.   Many would suggest a 4 point sway control Equal-I-zer.  If you are traveling at a leisurely pace you should be fine.  I tow very, very close to my rated capacity, but have almost no wind resistance.     
« Last Edit: January 14, 2011, 05:25:29 AM by gec66 » Logged

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allan
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2011, 08:03:23 AM »

I know what the tow specs are for my 07 F150 FX2 Sport and I have the tow package with a 5.4 engine. I now tow a 2007 Bayside with no problem but looking to go on road for many months at a time and will consider moving to a trailer. I have little experience towing bigger rigs. My question is --what is a realistic max tow weight and hitch weight  for spending many months and many miles over all conditions including mountain areas thru out the country. Most trailers I am looking at have a dry weight of 5500-6500 the a hitch weight of 400-650.  I hope to not be force to buy a bigger truck.    Thanks for any feedback based on your experience.

Your tow capacity,( I wish you had stated it). Depends on many factors. The max listed by Ford, is for a stripped down reg cab truck. As you add options, and weight. That of course comes down. It also comes down for any thing you put in the truck, bed, or cab.

Owning a F150 SuperCab. I would hesitate to buy a TT with a dry weight of 6000lbs, or more. Your probably going to add 1000lbs min to the TT. and a 7000lb TT will have a minimum tongue weight of 750lbs, and using the 15% rule. It will have a 1050lb tongue weight.

Were I you, and I'm not. I would shoot for a no more than a 7000lb loaded TT. The 150 will tow that well, and still go up the mountains OK. Not at full speed but it will go. There are a ton of really nice TTs that will get you into that weight, and lower. Look at Jayco, and Starcraft, Surveyor, and others.
As for towing the bigger, heavier TT. Not any harder than the pup. but be aware. MPG will drop like a rock, not so much because of weight, but more because of  pulling the big front wall thru the air. You will most definitely notice that.  And of course you will have to allow for the extra length as well. and it will not stop as quickly as the pup, but a good brake controler helps a bunch.

Hope this helps
« Last Edit: January 14, 2011, 08:13:20 AM by allan » Logged

TERRY AND SHAY
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2011, 08:30:05 AM »

I know what the tow specs are for my 07 F150 FX2 Sport and I have the tow package with a 5.4 engine.

You may but we don't ... fill us in!  GVWR, GCWR, trailer tow rating for your particular truck, and axle ratio are the most important and would really help others help you.  My similar 5.3L Silverado and 5.3L Avalanche have towed my 24' travel trailer that typically weighs ~ 5500 lbs loaded and ready to camp just fine over relatively flat terrain but serious upgrades require second gear.  Both vehicles had / have a non tow friendly 3.42 axle ratio ... 3.73 or better still 4.10 would make towing all that much easier as would be the case if your F150 has either rather than a 3.55.  I'd be willing to tow ~ 6000 lbs loaded with my current Avalanche and it's 3.42 but much more than that would be a strain, along with the fact the vehicle, with my family also in it at the time, really doesn't have enough remaining payload capacity to be able to accommodate much more tongue weight than it already is.  With my trailer weighing ~ 5500 lbs loaded and ready to camp I typically run a gross tongue weight of 13.6% or 750 lbs so obviously if I were foolish enough to try towing 7000 lbs that gross tongue weight would increase noticeably to well over 900 lbs, which is well beyond my vehicle's remaining payload capacity.  In your case, if you plan to tow alone, then having sufficient payload capacity for towing a heavier trailer won't be as much of an issue for you.
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Spartan I
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« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2011, 09:17:05 AM »

Additional info on vehicle---3.73 rear end and 10,000 pounds towing capacity.
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Gman
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« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2011, 10:19:26 AM »

Additional info on vehicle---3.73 rear end and 10,000 pounds towing capacity.

Not towing travel trailers. Towing capacity in the 1/2 ton world counts for little when considering TTs or worse, 5ers.

The reality is you'll never get near 10000 lbs. of travel trailer becuase it would likely produce 1300 + lbs. of tongue weight (if not more), which even with just a driver and a tank of gas would likely exceed the truck's payload, RAWR and possibly GVWR. Most standard tow equipped half tons are good for 7000 lbs. max of trailer. With an average family and gear in the truck + the 7k lb. trailer's tongue weight you'll be approaching or AT your payload and rear axle limits, in some cases even over depending on how the truck is equipped. Generally the more equipped e.g. 4x4, DVD, running boards, bed liner/cover, etc...etc... it ALL comes out of your usable payload.

From the truck's door sticker, get your GVWR e.g. 8500 lbs. Go weigh the truck at a scale house/CAT scale with you and a full tank of gas. Subtract that number from the listed GVWR and that gives you your effective payload. Estimate your family's combined weight and gear to be in the truck and subtract that number from your effective payload. Whatever is left, you can use for tongue weight. If you assume your tongue weight will be approx. 12.5% of the trailer's weight, which is reasonable for an average TT, divide your remaining payload by 12.5%, you'll have a weight in lbs. that your loaded trailer should weigh.

 
« Last Edit: January 20, 2011, 10:21:18 AM by Gman » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2011, 04:45:33 PM »

Additional info on vehicle---3.73 rear end and 10,000 pounds towing capacity.

More like 7700 max rated
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allan
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« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2011, 03:15:47 PM »

Additional info on vehicle---3.73 rear end and 10,000 pounds towing capacity.

More like 7700 max rated

Actually 150s with 5.4, 3.73s, and 17 inch tires, have no less than a 9500lb rating. Mine with 18 inch tires, and 3.55s has a 8000lb rating. You can argue with Ford about it. but that is their rating.

17 inch tires add 500lbs, and the 3.73 rear adds 1000lbs. At least that is what the owner's manual states.
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TERRY AND SHAY
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2011, 06:08:51 PM »

Additional info on vehicle---3.73 rear end and 10,000 pounds towing capacity.

More like 7700 max rated

Actually 150s with 5.4, 3.73s, and 17 inch tires, have no less than a 9500lb rating. Mine with 18 inch tires, and 3.55s has a 8000lb rating. You can argue with Ford about it. but that is their rating.

17 inch tires add 500lbs, and the 3.73 rear adds 1000lbs. At least that is what the owner's manual states.

sorry, read it as 97 Sad
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