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Author Topic: j hook for propane tank - where to find?  (Read 11376 times)
chipperone1
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« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2010, 01:13:08 AM »

   You could rebend the hooked end to to correct length leaving the threads intact.
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camperken
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« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2010, 02:09:38 PM »

Well I bit the bullet and drove back to the dealer. Luckily they had the correct size in stock and was able to just switch them out. Now my mission is to look for a nice cover to clean the front end up a bit more.

« Last Edit: July 21, 2010, 05:35:07 PM by camperken » Logged

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« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2010, 02:00:10 PM »

Since our PUP didn't come with propane and we recently added it, we were faced with the same question.  I did a lot of internet searching and kind of combined a couple of ideas I saw.  We used a couple of threaded rods and a hunk of angle iron (the kind with holes in it).  The angle iron fits through the holes in the sides of the handle collar of the tank and is tightened down onto the threaded rods with wing nuts (for ease of removing and refilling).  The bottoms of the rods are held on with regular nuts and washers.  All of maybe $10 (and some elbow grease to cut the length of angle iron.)   I'll take some pics tonight when I get home.

I tried this on our Utah today for the second propane tank, and it worked wonderfully. Thanks for the idea.
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« Reply #18 on: November 05, 2010, 02:21:17 PM »

 New Mexico  I puchase a set from my local dealer.  They were cheap.
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« Reply #19 on: November 05, 2010, 02:45:57 PM »

here's an on-line source  Smile
$20 bucks plus shipping
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rileysown
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« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2010, 03:21:19 PM »

An that $20 would get more expensive with shipping and duties to Canada. It cost less than that for the threaded rod, angle bracket, nuts and washers. Add a little sweat equity sawing stuff and I am done.
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« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2010, 04:35:33 AM »

An that $20 would get more expensive with shipping and duties to Canada. It cost less than that for the threaded rod, angle bracket, nuts and washers. Add a little sweat equity sawing stuff and I am done.
The J-hooks made from solid stock are a lot stronger than threaded rod and would definitely by my choice for safety reasons. 
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KristinU
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« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2010, 11:22:41 AM »

The J-hooks made from solid stock are a lot stronger than threaded rod and would definitely by my choice for safety reasons. 

Care to expand on this?  Anoyone else care to weigh in?  Our setup seems very solid, but I wouldn't want to be unsafe.
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chipperone1
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« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2010, 12:28:33 PM »


     
The J-hooks made from solid stock are a lot stronger than threaded rod and would definitely by my choice for safety reasons. 

Care to expand on this?  Anoyone else care to weigh in?  Our setup seems very solid, but I wouldn't want to be unsafe.

    Well since you did ask,

     The minor or root diameter of the thread would be the smallest cross sectional area or the weakest link.

     The factory j hooks appear to have roll formed threads just as the "all thread" does.

     The quality of the steel would be the kicker in my opinion.

     As far as your setup is concerned may I suggest you remove the sharp (square) corners, cut them on a 45 perhaps? File the corners round? I noticed the caps on top of the all thread so I assume you are concerned for "sharps", how about some on the bottom? One day you may be crawling around under the pup and peel your scalp like a banana! The bottom of the all thread in your pic looks a little nasty.

     Overall it looks good - strong enough for me!

     If you were concerned with retaining the propane in case of an accident, you could look at how the angle iron is attached to the pup.

     Just trying to help.
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KristinU
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« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2010, 12:53:04 PM »


     
The J-hooks made from solid stock are a lot stronger than threaded rod and would definitely by my choice for safety reasons. 

Care to expand on this?  Anoyone else care to weigh in?  Our setup seems very solid, but I wouldn't want to be unsafe.

    Well since you did ask,

     The minor or root diameter of the thread would be the smallest cross sectional area or the weakest link.

     The factory j hooks appear to have roll formed threads just as the "all thread" does.

     The quality of the steel would be the kicker in my opinion.

     As far as your setup is concerned may I suggest you remove the sharp (square) corners, cut them on a 45 perhaps? File the corners round? I noticed the caps on top of the all thread so I assume you are concerned for "sharps", how about some on the bottom? One day you may be crawling around under the pup and peel your scalp like a banana! The bottom of the all thread in your pic looks a little nasty.

     Overall it looks good - strong enough for me!

     If you were concerned with retaining the propane in case of an accident, you could look at how the angle iron is attached to the pup.

     Just trying to help.

LOL on the caps - DH bought those at a little local hardware store because he felt bad that they gave him advice about something else and tried really hard to find what he needed, but they didn't have it...but along the way when the guy was walking all over the store with him he saw the caps - so he spent a big 20 cents or so to make himself feel better about the time and effort the guy spent.  And yeah, the bottoms of the all-threads are nasty because they were too long so I had to cut 'em down with a hack saw.  I suppose I could have sanded them.  But caps will help them look nicer ;)  As for the angle iron - again, this is all manual with a hack saw, so no way no how am I gonna cut nice looking 45 degree angles, but I could look for caps for them.  We did that mid season, though, and no cuts yet, so I don't know how concerned I am with the exposed edges.
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chipperone1
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« Reply #25 on: November 09, 2010, 03:13:20 PM »

LOL on the LOL, I was thinking maybe just a little nip off the corner!
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rileysown
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« Reply #26 on: November 09, 2010, 06:47:40 PM »

That angle is fairly solid, at least the one I use it. As far as safety, without bending the threaded rods, I can't see that they present a real safety issue at all. The setup seem at least as solid as the j-hooks, maybe even more so.
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SkipD
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« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2010, 04:53:45 AM »

My concern was really about folks making their own "j-hooks" with threaded rod.   The problem is that bending the threaded rod is likely to weaken it significantly.  Also, as mentioned above, the structurally effective diameter of the threaded rod is much less than the diameter of the solid stock used in factory-made j-hooks where the bend is made. 
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rileysown
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« Reply #28 on: November 10, 2010, 06:05:41 AM »

My concern was really about folks making their own "j-hooks" with threaded rod.   The problem is that bending the threaded rod is likely to weaken it significantly.  Also, as mentioned above, the structurally effective diameter of the threaded rod is much less than the diameter of the solid stock used in factory-made j-hooks where the bend is made. 

True on the J-hooks. I could have went to an even larger diameter of threaded rod than the one the j-hooks use fairly easily.
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« Reply #29 on: May 04, 2014, 02:29:46 PM »

Here is my solution for making your own J-hooks for under $10 with parts from  Lowes. 

 

2 1/4-20 2 foot threaded rods, 2 1/4-20 couplers, 2 1/4-20 X 1 1/2 eye hooks, 2 S hooks, 2 washers, 2 wing nuts.

Your have to bend and then cut off the threaded rods. Bending the rods was easy by hand and and doesn't weaken them like trying to making a hook at the end.  I used the nut the came on the eye hook to lock it on to the coupler. Holds it tight and looks nice.
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