April 23, 2014, 10:40:39 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Gallery Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: Hooking portable propane stove to the big tank?  (Read 10982 times)
pianojuggler
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1352

Pacific Northwet


« on: March 12, 2009, 08:33:08 AM »

The background (sorry... I'm bored, it's too cold to go camping, and I like writing...):

I grew up with Coleman stoves.  The standard reliable stoves that use Coleman fuel.  We had a nice two-burner one when I was a kid. 

In college, I picked up an ancient one at a garage sale for $5.  It had the cylindrical tank with the filler cap on the end so you *had* to take the tank off to fill it.  It weighed a lot, but it was built like a tank.  It always worked flawlessly. 

Then when I started camping in larger groups, I picked up a three-burner stove at a garage sale for $15.  It came with its own collapsible stand that stores inside the stove.  It must weigh 20 pounds.  It's built like a tank.  It works mostly flawlessly.

My ex decided to sell my old two-burner stove at a garage sale.  (One reason she is my "ex".)  She reasoned that we had the three-burner beast, so we didn't need the two-burner one.  I later picked up a newer two-burner stove at a garage sale for $5.  It works mostly okay most of the time.  I had to replace a bushing in the valve.  It is definitely lighter and flimsier than my old old one.

Last year was our first year with the PUP.  Our PUP has a small two-burner propane stove.  I like the fact that it can be moved outside (with the low-pressure hose poking out through a hole).  Trying to cook in an eight-foot-box PUP isn't fun.  We still camp with a couple other couples.  So I brought along the two-burner Coleman -- and there were times we had everything plus another single burner stove going, making coffee, eggs, bacon, pancakes, hashbrowns, and heating water for washing dishes.   Half way into our long camping trip, we ran out of Coleman fuel.  I ended up driving through three towns before I found a can, and it was over $8.  Yikes.

I do have a spare Dual-Fuel generator for the two-burner stove, so I can convert it to run off gasoline, but I have been reluctant due to the smell of gasoline, and the rumors of increased maintenance.

So, by the end of last year's camping season, I decided to try adding a portable propane stove to the campin' kitchen instead of the old Coleman.  I found a "slightly used" Coleman propane stove on craigslist for $15.  (It turned out to be more than slightly used.)  It runs off the disposable propane cans.

I have the gizmo that supposedly allows you to refill the disposable cans from a big tank.  I haven't tried it yet, but I read with interest the thread that appeared here recently about them.  It sounds a little dicey.  Especially when it comes to transporting refilled cans.

The portable stove doesn't have a pressure regulator.  My Coleman Roadtrip propane grill -- that also uses disposable cans -- has a small pressure regulator that screws onto the can and then into the back of the grill.  The stove just has a rigid tube that goes from the can into the side of the stove.

Coleman offers an adapter -- with a couple feet of hose -- that allows you to run a Roadtrip grill off a 20 lb tank.  I have also seen aftermarket pieces that do the same thing.


The question (thanks for sticking with me so far):

How can I run the portable propane stove off the PUP's big tank? 

I'd like to have about 20 feet of hose between the tank and the stove so I can put the stove on a table near the PUP's stove when it's outside.  I'd like to have a minimum number of connections to make to connect and disconnect the portable stove.

Does the portable stove run correctly on tank pressure or on low pressure (like the PUP's stove)?

Can I put a Tee at the tank?

Do I need a pressure regulator like the Roadtrip grill has?

Any other recommendations to make this both safe and easy?

Thanks bunches.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2009, 03:54:10 AM by Ziva David » Logged

 SUV Blue 2000 ML430  PopUp Green 1995 Coleman Utah
bud121156
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 801


Western North Carolina


« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2009, 08:43:58 AM »

Thats exactly the reason I added a second tank. I run my Big Buddy heater and the Roadtrip Grill off the same 12ft hose and filter, sold with the Buddy heater.
You can see the grill and hose in this picture. Both work like a charm.
I have grilled in the yard using an extra 20lb tank sitting on the ground and hose/filter too.

Logged

Donnie & Cheryl North Carolina North Carolina
2011 KZ Sportsman 16RBT
2000 Chevrolet Silverado 4X4
pianojuggler
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1352

Pacific Northwet


« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2009, 08:49:37 AM »

Sounds great, Bud.  I have the Roadtrip LXE -- the one with the klunky folding stand with wheels, so it doesn't come camping with us.

Can you tell me how you made the connections to the big tank?  Or is your second tank dedicated to the Roadtrip and Buddy?
Logged

 SUV Blue 2000 ML430  PopUp Green 1995 Coleman Utah
bud121156
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 801


Western North Carolina


« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2009, 09:08:12 AM »

I use a hose just like this....  Big black screw to the tank and the other brass screw straight to the grill where the  disposable propane can would go. 

Logged

Donnie & Cheryl North Carolina North Carolina
2011 KZ Sportsman 16RBT
2000 Chevrolet Silverado 4X4
K-Pax
Handle Cranker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 66



WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2009, 02:45:02 PM »

Quote
I use a hose just like this....  Big black screw to the tank and the other brass screw straight to the grill where the disposable propane can would go.

May I prevail upon you to mention where you got such a thing?  That sure would make life easier around our camp. 

Logged

1995 Coleman/Fleetwood Stony Creek
1999 Honda Passport
bud121156
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 801


Western North Carolina


« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2009, 03:11:46 PM »

Got mine at Tractor Supply where I bought my Big Buddy heater.  I have seen them at Lowes too, by the Buddy heaters. Can get them on the internet too. Google "12 ft propane hose".
Logged

Donnie & Cheryl North Carolina North Carolina
2011 KZ Sportsman 16RBT
2000 Chevrolet Silverado 4X4
K-Pax
Handle Cranker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 66



WWW
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2009, 04:01:21 PM »

Well that's much simpler than I thought it would be.  I over-intellectualize sometimes I suppose.  Thanks, neighbor ! 
Logged

1995 Coleman/Fleetwood Stony Creek
1999 Honda Passport
boxsquad2
Wheel Chocker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 20


« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2009, 06:22:42 PM »

Sorry for barging in on your question BUT will a hose like that work to fuel my little grill that runs off the portable coleman fuel tanks? The grill is small - came with the camper and I can't remember the name (it's been too long since we've been out!) but it runs off the coleman propane tanks that are pressure rated at 15 psi.
Logged

Amy, DS 18, DD 17, DD 10, DD 8
Baytoven
Parking Heckler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3223


Aridzona


« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2009, 07:23:32 PM »

Running a briefcase style propane stove requires a propane line with enough pressure for the stove, usually 15-16 psi.  It won't run adequately on low pressure, which is 11" of water column, or less than psi.  You could tee off the tank at its unregulated pressure, above the regulators, with hose for unregulated pressure and screw fittings.  The stove should have its own regulator as it runs off unregulated tank pressure, just as your grill does.  (The OEM PUP stoves do not have regulators, and should only be connected with a regulated line, not unregulated tank pressure.)

Personally, I'd rather buy a second tank to use at the table, than to hassle with transporting propane hose in various lengths, not to mention the tripping hazard.
Logged

Baytoven(Me) & Gdog(DH)
DS('92) DS('95) DD('97)
'04 Expedition/'99 Niagara (aka Williamsburg)  PopUp Green SUV Red
Outbound
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1044


Oshawa, Ontario


« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2009, 04:42:38 AM »

For branching off your tank, Extend-a-flow or Extend-a-stay may suit your needs.  I've seen both at my local RV dealer, and although they're not cheap, they're not outrageous either.

But, I agree with Baytoven, a second tank - I'd choose a smaller 5 or 10 pound tank - gives you a lot more flexibility and you won't have to deal with long propane hoses or trying to connect hoses to the tank after the front bunk has been setup.
Logged

Craig
2009 r-pod 171  SUV Black 2008 Mazda Tribute GS-V6
1975 Lionel 80  PopUp Bronze
stylepig
Handle Cranker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 108


WWW
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2009, 06:12:24 AM »

I had a setup back when I was tenting that worked out really well for me. I had a 20# bottle that I put a propane "tree" on. I mounted a two mantle lantern on the top of it and two 6 ft hoses from the other two outlets on the tree that led two a two burner stove and a grill. All of the equipment came from Coleman. Take a look at thier website and you will see what I am talking about. I used that setup for 3 or 4 years and refilled that bottle twice and I was camping 10 or 12 long weekends a year.
Logged

Robb & Stephanie,
DD Gabrielle '99
DS Connor '05
annoying dog Juno '02

2006 Fleetwood Niagara
2005 Dodge Dakota, 4WD club cab, 4.7L V-8
Honda EU2000i
yellow legos, NOT a BAL leveler!
PUG's w/Reflectix inserts
CampChef Explorer 2 stove w/grill box

"Seen it all, participated in a little..."
pianojuggler
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1352

Pacific Northwet


« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2009, 06:56:18 AM »

I will look into the smaller tank...  There was a fellow at our usual CG last year who had a 7-pound tank that he used for his stove (and maybe some other propane-using-devices).  The problem was that it didn't have an OPD.  He said he took it to about ten different places before he found someone who would fill it.

Part of my dilemma is that the PUP is basically at GVWR when we have it loaded up, so I'm trying to find a solution that will reduce our total weight.  I'd rather not schlep along a second propane tank if I don't have to.

I think the extend-a-flow Tee fitting is what I had in mind.  I'll look for one and a long hose.
Logged

 SUV Blue 2000 ML430  PopUp Green 1995 Coleman Utah
Idahoboondock
Wheel Chocker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 11



« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2009, 04:13:03 PM »

I bought a used popup and the tank that it came with has a T.  One is hooked up to the trailers system and the other is blocked most of the time.  It also came with a long hose (maybe 25 ft) that I can hook up and connect to lanterns/bbqs that typically use propane canisters.  Pretty trick system without having to carry an extra tank around.  Sorry I can't help in where to find such a thing but they must be available and it works well for me.
Logged

 PopUp Green 2002 Coleman Laramie
Toyota Tacoma Crew Cab

"Not all who wander are lost" JRR Tolkien
silvermickey2002
Wheel Chocker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 20



WWW
« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2009, 07:24:03 AM »

We also use our Coleman camping stove. While cooking breakfast or dinner we always need more burners to cook on. I installed an LP adapter (pictured below and purchased for $50.00). The hose hooks up to the fitting without disconecting the trailer from the tank. We use an 8 foot hose we picked up in Walmart in the camping section for about $15.00-$17.00.

« Last Edit: May 02, 2009, 07:30:24 AM by silvermickey2002 » Logged

Gary
'08 Fleetwood Seapine, '05 Honda Odyssey, '02 F150 4x4 SuperCab (2011 Nights in Pup-9 / Tent camped-12)
Assistant Scoutmaster
beemerboy
Chocks-a-lot
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 349



WWW
« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2009, 11:46:43 AM »

What I am considering doing is to tee off the line befoe the regulator and running copper tubing under the trailer  and mounting an outlet of some type next to the low pressure outlet on my Coleman TAOS. That way I have the option to use either a stove or a lantern without having to carry an extra tank.  I would add a secondary shutoff near the tee if I'm not using that line.
Logged

On my journey, all I need is a wooded path, a dog by my side to lead me home and a bench to sit upon when I get tired - Wayne

http://www.waynesdoghouse.com
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  



Powered by SMF 1.1.8 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC