April 23, 2014, 02:31:12 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Gallery Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Help! Need remodel and repair advice 1995 Jayco  (Read 3510 times)
mls052603
Handle Cranker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 39


WWW
« on: August 04, 2008, 05:41:05 PM »

Hi everyone,

My husband and I are completely new to pop-ups as we just purchased our first one the other day. It's a 1995 Jayco Eagle 10UD and in need of some repairs. Obviously, we have a small budget or we would have purchased something newer, but we thought we'd try to give this one a face lift instead. Here are our issues (that we know of so far): (please don't laugh if some of these ideas are way out there...I'm new)

Some canvas tears - Are patches available? Would a hot glue gun work to repair hems that wrap around the pull out beds?

Furnace - blows room temperature air. Is there a heating element similar to a dryer that can be replaced? Any other ideas? Atwood Mobile 7916-II 16,000 BTU

Remodeling ideas - I'd like to take down the little curtains it came with and add some that roll or slide up and down instead. Is reupholstering cushions difficult? What would it cost me to have them done by a seamstress? Are there places that do this? And finally, can I paint the ugle faux wood around the sink area? Has anyone done it? How does it look?

Any pics and advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Monica

Logged

 
BillMc
Back-er-in-er
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1247


WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2008, 04:20:30 AM »

Make sure you have the propane turned on, and that the piliot light is lit. Then turn thromsat up and it should work. Pilot light should be behind a sight glass. If the seams are weak you may need to emove the canvas and take it to a awning/tent shop to get resewn.BillMcBrotherhood of the Lnyx27 Fleetwood Niagara24 Chevrolet Tahoewife of 25 years2-sons[flown the cop,but show up unexceptedly]2-daughters1@college 1 own her own, just like the boys they show up]a bad day camping is better then a great day at workhttp://community.webshots.com/user/billmc111[popgrey] SUV Green KansasMissouri
Logged

Brotherhood of the Lnyx
2014 Jayco Swift 248RBS
2012 Chevrolet Silverado
wife of 30 years
2-sons[flown the coop,but show up unexceptedly]
2-daughters, just like the boys they show up]
a bad day camping is better then a great day at work
http://community.webshots.com/user/billmc111
 PopUp Grey SUV Green KansasMissouri
sferguson
Wheel Chocker
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 14



« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2012, 07:01:50 AM »

Looking to do some upgrades this year as well. Ideas would be greatly helpful, as my wife and I are new to this.

I want to get an awning, and that is not an issue. It's the canvas at the bunk ends that need repairing. I am trying to find more information on fixing this.

I like the idea of the curtains. I want to change them as well. There is also a curtain that is in the shower area that I cannot seem to find information on. The track is there, but no hardware.

I also need to get the toilet repaired, as that does not work. I also want to look into connecting a battery to it as well.

Any ideas / help on these item would be a big help. Thanks
Logged

1995 Jayco Eagle 12KB
1997 Ford Explorer
2003 Dodge Grand Caravan
wavery
PUX is my life
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13057


TrailManor.......TRUE Pop-Up


« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2012, 08:35:01 AM »

Looking to do some upgrades this year as well. Ideas would be greatly helpful, as my wife and I are new to this.

I want to get an awning, and that is not an issue. It's the canvas at the bunk ends that need repairing. I am trying to find more information on fixing this.

I like the idea of the curtains. I want to change them as well. There is also a curtain that is in the shower area that I cannot seem to find information on. The track is there, but no hardware.

I also need to get the toilet repaired, as that does not work. I also want to look into connecting a battery to it as well.

Any ideas / help on these item would be a big help. Thanks
Just a suggestion........ try the "Search" option for some of these things. There are several discussions on each that I think you may find helpful.

If you still need help, a separate thread for each item with pics will get you the answers you need. Especially on the canvas repair. Some of us have good ideas for canvas repair but can't offer much help unless we have a pretty good idea what you are talking about................ "a picture is more valuable than a thousand words"
Logged

Wayne, Carolyn & Sccamp 14  grandkids  ...Southern California
--------------
'98 Winnebago Adventurer 33
160W Solar Panels, Dual 6V Batteries

EX PU- '04 Trailmanor 2720SL........ 

3X PU '02 Coleman Tacoma

EX- TV - 2006 Chevy Silverado 1500 (ext cab) 157" WB.
austinado16
Guest
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2012, 08:50:11 AM »

Monica, your furnace is probably a direct spark ignition unit.  If so, it has no pilot light.  It uses propane to fuel the internal burner, just like a forced air gas unit in a home.  

To operate the furnace:
- turn on the propane valve very slowly at the propane tank.  There's a leak detection valve inside modern propane tanks that gets triggered if you open the valve on the tank fast.  So crack the valve open, listen for that leak detection plunger to go "clink" and then open the valve the rest of the way.  

-next, light a couple of the burners on the stove.  This gets the propane flowing through the camper's low pressure propane line, and helps get the air out of the line.  The furnace can't light if it's not getting 100% propane from the gas line.  Once you have the burners working, you've not only removed most of the air from the line, you've confirmed you have working gas system (at least to the stove).

-now it's time to light the furnace.  Open the door on the furnace.  If the furnace is an earlier version that should have a pilot light manually lit, you will find a spark ignitor button that you repeatedly push down, like lighting a home BBQ.  You'll also find that the gas valve next to the burner box has an "off/pilot/on" knob.  If it does, you rotate the knob to "pilot" and push the knob full in/down and hold it.  While holding the knob in/down, you start clicking the manual ignitor until you see the pilot flame light in the viewing window.  Once lit, continue holding in/down on the knob for about 30 seconds to allow the thermocouple to get hot.  Then let up on the knob and rotate it to the "on" position.  The furnace is now armed and can be operated using the thermostat on the wall somewhere in the camper.  There will be an on/off lever on the thermostat.  These are tough to push, but need to be shoved into the "on" position.  Once "on" you can set the thermostat temperature as you would do at home.

-if the furnace is a direct spark model, open the door on the furnace and check to see if there's an on/off/reset button.  Make sure it's not "off."  You may also find lighting instructions there.  These furnaces will self ignite just by you turning the thermostat "on" and setting the temp as I detailed above.  You should hear the blower fan and then rapid clicking of the ignitor, followed by a soft "woosh" of the burner lighting up.

Both versions of furnace require either a fully charged camper battery, or that the camper is plugged into 120v house current (we call it "shore power" here).  This is because there is a safety switch that must be triggered by how hard the blower fan is blowing.  If the fan doesn't blow hard enough (usually due to a low charge in the camper battery) the furnace will be kept from lighting.......so in this scenario, all you get is the blower fan running non-stop, and you'll never here the ignitor clicking. Or, if it's a pilot light model, you'll just get the blower fan, but no "woosh" of the burner.

Let us know what happens and we can help you further.

As to the canvas.  Repair it right the first time, and you won't have leaks out in the field.  Depending on the extent of the tears or damage, a local upholstery shop can probably handle the repair.  The tenting is fairly easy to remove, so just take down the sections to be repaired and take them to the local shop.  If the canvas needs more extensive repair, send it to either Bear Creek Canvas or Canvas Replacements (both oline).  That's who everyone uses.

For the re-upholstery of the cushions.  You'll need to have this done at an upholstery shop.  Very few "seemstress's" will have the sewing machine or the skillset.  One thing to think about; you're not going to live in it, so is the .001% of the time that you will be in it, worth the "remodel?"  The other thing is; once you've done that, does it make the camper tough to sell in the future because no one else likes what you've done?  Same goes for the painting of the fake wood grain, and curtain changes.  Sometimes, discression is the bettery part of valor....followed by "less is more."  But only you know the answer and what's best for you guys.

My advice would be; leave the camper as-is, and spend a season camping in it.  If at the end of the season, you really love it, but can't stand the decor, and plan to keep it for years and years, go to town and make it your own.   Personally, when I'm looking at used campers (and I look a lot) when I see one that's be redecorated I am always turned off.  I'd rather see "welcome to the 80's plaid with mauve or dusty blue" then someone's idea of "I saw this in Better Homes and Gardens and had to have it."

Your mileage may vary, of course.
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  



Powered by SMF 1.1.8 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC